Last edited by Voodoole
Saturday, May 16, 2020 | History

1 edition of Black litigants in the antebellum American South found in the catalog.

Black litigants in the antebellum American South

Kimberly M. Welch

Black litigants in the antebellum American South

by Kimberly M. Welch

  • 333 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Social conditions,
  • African Americans,
  • Actions and defenses,
  • History

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementKimberly M. Welch
    SeriesThe John Hope Franklin series in African American history and culture, John Hope Franklin series in African American history and culture
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE185.92 .W45 2018
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiv, 306 pages
    Number of Pages306
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL26974674M
    ISBN 101469636433
    ISBN 109781469636436
    LC Control Number2017026939
    OCLC/WorldCa990778129

      Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South. Muhammad Published online: 16 Apr book review Cul de Sac: patrimony, capitalism, and slavery in French Saint-Domingue. Forsdick Published online: 16 Apr Slave Childcare and Childhood in the Antebellum South. Damian Alan Pargas. Pages:   Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South In the antebellum Natchez district, in the heart of slave country, black people sued white people in all-white courtrooms. They sued to enforce the terms of their contracts, recover unpaid debts, recuperate back wages, and claim damages for : Indiana University Press.

    By slavery was primarily located in the South, where it existed in many different forms. African Americans were enslaved on small farms, large .   Of the appellate civil cases between Black and white litigants examined, Black litigants received a favorable decision from the state supreme court in cases. See Tables B, B, B and B in Milewski, Litigating Across the Color Line, ↩ City of Harrodsburg v. Sallee, Ky. (). ↩.

    Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South (The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture) by Kimberly M Welch avg rating — 4 ratings. Her first book—Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South (University of North Carolina Press, )—is a historical and socio-legal study of free and enslaved African Americans’ use of the local courts in the cotton South. The book investigates unpublished and unexplored lower court records from the Natchez district of Mississippi.


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Black litigants in the antebellum American South by Kimberly M. Welch Download PDF EPUB FB2

“Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South challenges our understandings of the relationship between black people and the law in the antebellum South. Welch gives us a more complete picture of the black legal experience in civil--not criminal--litigation, where property rights precede and function as civil rights in the s.

Book Description: In the antebellum Natchez district, in the heart of slave country, black people sued white people in all-white courtrooms.

They sued to enforce the terms of their contracts, recover unpaid debts, recuperate back wages, and claim damages for assault. They sued in conflicts over property and personal status.

And they often won. In the antebellum Natchez district, in the heart of slave country, black people sued white people in all-white courtrooms. They sued to enforce the terms of their contracts, recover unpaid debts, recuperate back wages, and claim damages for assault.

They sued in conflicts over property and personal status. And they often by: 4. This book is a historical study of free and enslaved African Americans’ use of the local courts in the antebellum American South. Specifically, I investigate unpublished and largely unexplored lower court records from the Natchez district of Mississippi and Louisiana between and in which free black and enslaved litigants sued whites and other African Americans.

Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South challenges our understandings of the relationship between black people and the law in the antebellum South. Welch gives us a more complete picture of the black legal experience in civil--not criminal--litigation, where property rights precede and function as civil rights in the s.

Kimberly M. Welch ends Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South with the story of how it began, with digging through rotting documents stored loosely in boxes or garbage bags and dusted with the droppings of various pests.

The book is based on Welch’s study of over one thousand civil lawsuits filed by black litigants between and in the Author: W. Caleb McDaniel. Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South challenges our understandings of the relationship between black people and the law in the antebellum South.

Welch gives us a more complete picture of the black legal experience in civil—not criminal—litigation, where property rights precede and function as civil rights in the : The University of North Carolina Press.

Get this from a library. Black litigants in the antebellum American South. [Kimberly M Welch] -- "This work explores free and enslaved African Americans' involvement in a broad range of civil actions in the Natchez district of Mississippi and Louisiana. In the antebellum Natchez district, in the heart of slave country, black people sued white people in all-white courtrooms.

They sued to enforce the terms of their contracts, recover unpaid debts, recuperate back wages, and claim damages for assault.

New from The University of North Carolina Press: Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South by Kimberly M. Welch. About the book, from the publisher:In the antebellum Natchez district, in the heart of slave country, black people sued white people in all-white : Marshal Zeringue.

Her first book—Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South (University of North Carolina Press, )—is a historical and socio-legal study of free and enslaved black Americans’ use of the local courts in the slave South.

The book investigates unpublished and unexplored lower court records from the Natchez district of Mississippi and. Kimberly Welch is the author of Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South (University of North Carolina Press, ).

Welch is Assistant Professor of History and Assistant Professor of Law at Vanderbilt University. Her book explores the history of free and enslaved black Americans use of local courts in the Cotton South. Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South Kimberly Welch draws on over 1, examples of free and enslaved black litigants who used the courts to protect their interests and reconfigure their place in a tense society.

Black Litigants in. Faculty News News and Book Publications updated December 9, News Kim Welch has won the Cromwell Book Prize from the American Society for Legal History for her book, Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South ().

The William Nelson Cromwell Foundation awards annually to a junior scholar a book prize for excellence. Kimberly Welch’s Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South (University of North Carolina Press, ) has won the James Broussard First Book prize committee, including Gregory Nobles (Chair), Ronald Johnson, and Cynthia Kierner, found that Welch’s diligence and intelligence are both very much on display in this exceptionally fine book.

Just Published: Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South. Posted by casadm on Friday, Janu in DH Center Blog, News. Congratulations to Professor Kim Welch, DH Faculty Fellow, on the publication of her new book, Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South!Author: Casadm.

Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South, Welch's first book, is a historical and socio-legal study of free and enslaved black Americans’ use of the local courts in the slave South.

The book investigates unpublished and unexplored lower court records from the Natchez district of Mississippi and Louisiana between and in which.

Books shelved as antebellum-south: Kindred by Octavia E. Butler, The House Girl by Tara Conklin, The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom, Gone with the Win.

Welch, Kimberly M., Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, ). See also Aslakson, Kenneth R., Making Race in the Courtroom: The Legal Construction of Three Races in Early New Orleans (New York: New York University Press, ); Jones, Martha, “ Hughes v.

Just Published: Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South. Jan. 19, — Congratulations to Professor Kim Welch, DH Faculty Fellow, on the publication of her new book, Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South.

Read more. Welcome to the UNC Press American History Catalog! Save 40% on our new and recent books in African American History — and on any UNC Press book. Plus, if your order totals $ or more, shipping is free!

Remember to enter promo code 01DAH40 at checkout!Kimberly Welch is the author of Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South (University of North Carolina Press, ). Welch is Assistant Professor of History and Assistant Professor of Law at Vanderbilt University.

Cromwell Book Prize Winner: Kimberly M. Welch, Black Litigants in the Antebellum American South (University of North Carolina Press, ) Black Litigants is a tour de force of meticulous and arduous archival work, and the slow piecing together of documents to construct a nuanced, sophisticated and rich narrative.